The Names of Brahman joins us as One

There are many different schools of Dravidian Hindu Aaiyyanist thought, but we are all united by our belief in Brahman and how his very being permeates throughout all of us and all Universes. Now the very term Dravidian Hindu Aaiyyanism is an English translation of our creed. One should really call it Dravidian Aaiyyanism as it is more ancient than the Northern Indus Valley tradition where the name ‘Hindu’ originates from.  We are also not of the “Sanatana Dharma” either. The thoughts, ideas, scriptures and scripts of Dravidian Aaiyyanism are much more ancient than Sanskrit or even ancient Tamil (Tamil-Brahmi). It is the language that Brahman gave to Siva and Murugan in order for the ancient humans to communicate directly with Brahman. Each Aaiyyanist tradition has its own thoughts on how the transition of knowledge from Brahman to Siva and/or Murugan took place; suffice it to say that it did take place over 70-100,000 years ago.

Stepping back for one moment though and returning to the notion of names. As all true Dravidian Aaiyyanists know, even the names of Brahman, Siva and Murugan are not the true names of the beings we worship. There is no direct English translation, and we do not want to reduce the power of the names by giving a direct sound/linguistic equivalent.  Most Aaiyyanists learn the true names at an early age as is the Dravidian oral tradition. All Aaiyyanists are bound as children, learning the mystical and truly powerful names of the Gods as spoken in their original language: Dravidian Aaiyyani. This is what binds us.

Remember Dravidian Aaiyyani is the only language that I know of where you need to meditate on a particular meaning while speaking the word in order to fully understand ‘The Truth’. The word and meaning maybe dissimilar, but as a whole may point to a new understanding.

Another habit that binds us is reading (or writing) the symbols to form a mental image while visualising something entirely different: e.g. as many Aaiyyanist children learn at an early age:  writing the Daiyyannian Loka while actually seeing via the mind’s eye the Lokataliyyan (Siva-Murugan) construct. This paradox of language, speaking, writing, thinking and constructing visually is what binds all Aaiyyanists: from the Pacifist Schools of Parishaantaa to the Martial Schools of SainikaH, and the many other schools that seem diametrically opposite.

So what am I saying here? Well in summary, there are many many differences in the teachings of different schools of Aaiyyanist thought. But what binds us is our language, culture and understanding on the origins and endings of Brahman and his many aspects.

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